Attorney Eric Price
Shares

How to Stop or Appeal a Deportation Order

  • a few months ago
Shares

Receiving a deportation order from United States can be a devastating event. However, such an order does not mean your immigration case has come to an end. Depending on the circumstances of your case, there are ways to challenge a deportation order and stay in the United States. The following post will teach you how to revoke a deportation order by determining whether you have grounds to appeal or challenge the order and getting assistance from an immigration attorney.

What is the Deportation Order Process?

A deportation order occurs as a result of an adverse decision entered by a judge on an immigration case. A deportation order will typically be entered after the applicant has presented his or her case in court. If you disagree with the decision of the immigration judge, you have the right to appeal to the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) for relief. Types of relief at this stage in the process include discretionary relief, cancellation of removal, asylum, voluntary departure, and administrative relief. To be considered, an appeal must be filled within 30 days from the date that it was issued by the court.

Determining if You Can Appeal

There must be a legitimate reason to appeal a deportation order. The bases on which an applicant may file an appeal are outlined below.

Motion to Reopen in Absentia Decision

If your deportation is based on the fact that you didn’t appear at your hearing, you may file a motion to reopen to lift the in-absentia order. You will automatically and immediately get a “stay of deportation” by filing a motion to reopen the case. The stay will last at least as long as it takes the judge to determine whether or not to reopen your case. If the judge grants the motion to reopen, you can’t be deported while the case is going on.

Motion to Reopen due to Changed Circumstances

As the name suggests, if your personal circumstances have changed since your court decision, you may be able to reopen your case. A common example of this is changed country conditions. If conditions in your home country have turned hostile and therefore you feel as if it is unsafe to return, you could be eligible to reopen your case under a changed circumstances argument.

New Facts or Evidence

If new information has been discovered, you might be eligible to reopen and have your case heard based on the new facts or evidence. The court will consider the new evidence in relation to the type of relief you have submitted for.

How to File an Appeal

The first step in filing for an appeal is to complete a Notice of Appeal (Form EOIR-26) and provide a copy of it to the attorney who represented the United States government at your hearings. You must advise the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) that you did this by including a “Proof of Service.” Form EOIR-26 asks you whether you plan to file an additional written brief or statement later, and it is highly recommended that you do so with your attorney’s assistance. There is a filing fee of $110.00 that must be paid by a check with your name and alien number on it made out to “United States Department of Justice.” After receiving your Notice of Appeal, BIA will send you a deadline for submitting your brief.

Get Help from an Immigration Lawyer

Working towards getting a revocation of your deportation order requires adherence to strict deadlines and expert knowledge of the inner-workings of the law. It is extremely important to hire an immigration attorney who is educated on how to appeal a deportation order, because not only can the process be difficult and complex, but it can also result in your removal from the United States. Check credentials and get reliable references before hiring, and be sure to develop a relationship with your attorney!

Contact Attorney Eric Price Today!

We encourage you to schedule a free consultation today! Contact Attorney Eric Price to get professional assistance in stopping your deportation order!

Leave a Comment:

Popular posts